Information and Resources for Solopreneurs

What Makes a Good Video?

Written By: SiteSell in Social Media | May 9, 2011

Social Media

There are specific factors which make or break the impact your video has on visitors. Try these tips…

Video Quality Factors

1) Comfort

Discomfort in front of the camera translates loud and clear. Try this fun technique to relax and act more natural in front of the camera…

Film a short video on a subject that makes you smile, even laugh. Something deliberately silly (like a special tongue twister report) is a good choice to take your mind off of the video camera. Do it speaking into the camera, until you can actually smile and feel at ease. Eventually, you will forget that you are nervous about the camera.

Enlist the help of a friend or loved one (someone you’re comfortable with) to act as your audience. Seat them beside or behind the camera while you’re filming.

Have a well-rehearsed script (more on the importance of a script below). Your finished video will be more believable if it’s obvious you know exactly what you want to say and how to best express it.

When you edit the footage, you can cut out any clips you aren’t happy with. With a bit of practice, you will find the camera less intimidating. Then you can get down to business and create captivating, informative video for your site.

2) Video Length

Keep your content as tight as possible.

Instructional videos are longer by nature. Viewers expect that. Promotional videos should be limited to 90 seconds.

It is tempting to squeeze too much into a video. But remember, it’s hard to hold the viewer’s attention for much longer than 90 seconds — unless you’ve got them on the edge of their seat, which is difficult to do.

3) Script

Have a prepared, rehearsed script. Take the time to write a script and record yourself delivering the words. Thorough preparation with your script provides the following benefits to your finished video…

Increased comfort level, which allows you to relax while filming (as mentioned above). By knowing your script inside/out, you can simply go on “auto-pilot” without worrying about what you’re going to say.

Improved voice elements. By recording your script and playing it back to yourself, you’ll learn about where you want to tweak your delivery (i.e., add inflection in your tone, or pause a little longer between ideas). In the end, your verbal communication will be more effective, and your video will have a more professional feel.

4) Focus

Hold viewers’ attention by producing a focused, naturally flowing video. Avoid getting so involved in the technicalities of filming and editing that you lose the central message. Ask yourself these three critical questions…

Is my main theme/subject apparent throughout?

Is the progression from one part of the video to the other smooth or expected?

How conclusive is the ending? Does it have a strong link to the main body of the video?

Additional Tips

Filming in wide screen format can also boost the quality of your video.

Always scrutinize your finished video.

Pay extra attention to the above points when preparing, filming, and editing your video. Your finished project will express your message with confidence, in a way your visitors will enjoy and understand.

Now for the things to avoid…

Top 5 Mistakes

1) Poor Audio

Visitors need to hear your video in order to benefit from it. Audio quality is a common technical challenge. Distorted audio can have a dire impact on your finished video.

2) Slow Start

Grab your visitor’s attention right off the bat. Viewers won’t tolerate a sluggish beginning for more than a few seconds.

3) Hard Selling

This approach is as transparent in video as it is in your content. Use your video to PREsell in the same genuine way you do throughout the rest of your site, but avoid blatant, “in-your-face” sales pitches.

4) Too Much Text

Video is a visual medium, so don’t make folks read much. Text is rarely a good idea, except for very special reasons and only in selected spots.

5) Ineffective Titles

Your title is your “grabber.” Make it snappy, sharp, and relevant. Get the click through to your video.

Bottom Line

Your videos need not be professional calibre to effectively draw traffic to, and help monetize, your site. However, if the quality of your videos is poor, visitors won’t be compelled to share them (or even watch them to the end).

Make your videos the highest quality you can, using the skills and equipment you have at hand. Do that and your visitors will watch them, enjoy them… and then share them and/or deliver your “Most Wanted Response” (ex., clicking on an embedded affiliate link).

Attention to small details makes the difference. Happy filming!

SiteSell
SiteSell is a privately held Canadian-based company that helps everyday people start profitable online businesses.

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